Friday, June 19, 2009

Israel's special political Vocabulary!


Saree Makdisi hit the nail on the head in his Op-Ed published in the Los Angeles Times today, describing Netanyahu's vision for a two-"state" solution as a "mortal blow to the quest for a two-state solution."

Unfortunately, the LA Times, NY Times and other widely-circulated publications celebrated Netanyahu's speech, without examining what he really meant.

In fact, a special vocabulary has been developed for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the United States. It filters and structures the way in which developing stories are misread here, making it difficult for readers to fully grasp the nature of those stories -- and maybe even for journalists to think critically about what they write.

The Israeli Prime Minister declared his endorsement of a Palestinian State as long as Palestinians does not have an army, and as long as Palestinian recognize Israel as a Jewish State, which means that Palestinians have to recognize that Palestinian citizens of Israel are second class citizens and that no refugees shall return to their original homes. In addition, Israel's ever-expanding colonies (aka settlements) shall continue to grow.

Makdisi reminds us of what the definition of the word "State" is:

Look up the word "state" in the dictionary. You'll probably see references to territorial integrity, power and sovereignty. The entity that Netanyahu was talking about on Sunday would lack all of those constitutive features. A "state" without a defined territory that is not allowed to control its own borders or airspace and cannot enter into treaties with other states is not a state, any more than an apple is an orange or a car an airplane.

Read the entire piece here.
Post a Comment